kitchen

A Timeless Pattern for 2015

Herringbone is definitely making a statement in the design scene lately. This classic & timeless pattern has slowly been gathering speed over the years and is showing up in places everywhere from the bathroom to bedroom! While this pattern is making it's statement, another familiar is fading into the background: Chevron.

Chevron has been the hyper trend of the past few years and has been applied to everything from curtains to mugs. It has been used so much that many designers are steering away from Chevron patterns going forward. If you're about to make a purchase you might want to keep that in mind!

When you compare Herringbone to Chevron they book look zig-zaggy so you may be wondering what's the big difference? Chevron is typically being used as a high contrast simple zig zag pattern where the individual pieces meet at an angle. Herringbone has a more intentional pattern repeat and creates a broken zig zag. The pattern looks well defined and geometric, and when translated from a weave to a dimensional object each piece intersects at 90 degree angles, as shown below. (image source)

The herringbone pattern originates from a type of fabric weave used in traditional men's blazers and suits. (image source)

Below you can see a close up of the pattern, which is nicely described as the following:

Herringbone describes a distinctive V-shaped weaving pattern . It is distinguished from a plain chevron by the break at reversal, which makes it resemble a broken zigzag. The pattern is called herringbone because it resembles the skeleton of a herring fish

(image & quote source)

 

Here are a few ways that herringbone is making a classic and beautiful comeback in interiors.

 

 

 
 

 

1st Dibs on This Habitat Collection

Well it's been a busy few weeks but I am excited to say that I can finally share some pictures and links for a staging job I recently worked on. Someone had contacted me about staging a home that was completely vacant. I offered a few options, one of which was to stage with inventory and furniture from the Habitat Restore. They chose that option and the fun began!

First I met them at the house for a staging consultation. That's when I walk around and asses the space, make recommendations, then decide what type of furniture and layouts would work best for each room. Every home is different, and here we focused on these 3 impact rooms: living room, dining room, and kitchen.

Empty home before staging

The day before staging I walked the Restore floor and found pieces that worked together and fit my plan. That was a good practice in my "use what you have" training and philosophy. Whatever was available on the floor at that moment was what I could use. No time to make changes, order anything else, or shop around. I used only what was available - good thing the Restore has a lot of great pieces!

The day of staging I met the movers at the Restore to help coordinate the furniture pick-up. I worked with a team from Junk-A-Haulics, and they were fantastic! Everything was packed and unpacked quickly and very carefully. You can see them in action here :)


Junk-A-Haulics in action

Then the fun part for me really began - rearranging the furniture and adding decorative touches through accessories. Once everything was in place the transformation was complete! It's amazing what a difference furniture makes in showing a home. Many home buyers have a hard time imagining themselves and their furniture in a space, so staging helps potential home buyers see the scale of a room with furniture, and suggestions how they can use it.

Ta da! Same house after staging.

The best part of using Habitat Restore for staging is that all these pieces of furniture are available for sale, so make sure to read through to the bottom! Here are some more before and after photos:

Living room before

living room after

living room after

living room after staging

Dining room before

Dining room after

Fireplace before

Fireplace after

Foyer before

Foyer after

And while I don't have any "before" pictures of the kitchen or front porch I wanted to show the "afters" anyway!

Kitchen after

Kitchen after with butcher block cart in previously empty space.

Countertop staging

Front porch after staging

Ok, so now that you've seen what items I used from the Restore I am excited to say you can have first dibs to buy these items!! They have been listed for sale on ebay so you can buy any of them right now. We have it set up so you can use paypal online or pay at the store when you pick up. The only catch?? These items won't be back at the Restore until Tue Oct 21st. So that's it! See something you like? Take a look at the listing here!

http://www.ebay.com/usr/morrisrestore973

And make sure you click "see all items" for a full list. Act quick - the beautiful dining table and coffee table have already been sold!

Any questions send me an email or call, just click the contact link below for information.

Cheers!

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Broken Kitchen (Sets)

Kitchens are such a fascinating anthropological study of our social habits, and design trends are just the tip of the iceberg! Over time kitchens have radically evolved depending how families socially interact with each other. Kitchens of today are a very neutral space where everyone can participate in creating a delicious meal. In addition people are seeking an open floor plan where rooms flow into each other and they want kitchens to be part of that. 

 

I think one way that kitchens are achieving this open concept is by breaking up the sets. Just like so many other areas of the home matchy matchy is falling out of favor and the kitchen transition is following suit.  We are starting to see mixed cabinetry, perhaps the kitchen island is a different color than the cabinets so it looks more like furniture.

Via BeautifulHomes&Designs

Via becomegorgeous.com

Or sometimes the upper and lower cabinet finishes are mixed

 

ICFF KITCHEN & BATH: Part 2

Phew it really feels like summer here in the northeast...  it's been kind of refreshing to look at all these water related designs! Here are some more beautiful fixtures and hardware design from the ICFF, as a follow up from my previous post.

Blu Bathworks

Now I remember some of the photos I lost during my computer transition.... I took photos of their booth during ICFF because I liked how they showcased their sinks with engravings and colors. These screen shots from their brochure and website will have to substitute!

Blu Bathworks ICFF booth 2013

Blu-stone bathtub with engraving along the sides.

Colorful lime green tub made from proprietary blu-stone

Rohl

Handcrafted sinks from Shaws of Darwen in partner with Rohl.

Rohl offers a line of water filtration options (for information on how it works click here), this one shown in an inca brass finish.

Graff

Headquartered in Milwaukee with locations throughout the world, they provide modern bath fixtures for the industry. I found it impressive that during manufacturing they created a zero discharge system and they recycle 100% of their brass and paper products so just about everything they create is either recycled or recovered. Bravo Graff!

Here is my favorite of their from the show - their new Ametis line. This is definitely a stand out design and I love the LED light around the toggle... so technical looking and not your typical bath fixture. I had a hard time finding more information (and pictures!) but I hope the LED changes with the water temperature. I photographed their catalog so apologies for not having the most clarity!

ICFF KITCHEN & BATH: Part 1

Here it is... I am finally catching up on the rest of my ICFF material! Although quite some time has passed since I first went to the show I feel it is still worth showing all these beautiful designs. Some of them might not be a good fit for your home per se, but I love to show what the design world has been up to - pushing boundaries and exploring options. It's almost like the fashion runway for product design, and it's at shows like these that new designs are introduced and some design elements will trickle down into every day designs. 

Hardware in general is like the jewelry of the room. Literally... they are shiny, mostly metal, and used as an accent and accessory. Such a small detail in the grand scheme of a room design but it's something you physically interact with everyday so it becomes a very personal product, especially in the kitchen and bathroom!

My hands-down favorite during the show was Italian design company Fantini. Their collections are very diverse and each one equally beautiful! Their "I Balocchi" line was really fun and colorful. I liked their chunky handles and could see this working well in a kids bathroom or just anywhere you want to add some fun color!

I Balocchi

With their logo on the handle and bright color it also has a "sportcar" aesthetic - what do you think?

They also had a beautifully elegant collection called Venezia with handles made from murano glass. It's such a beautiful material combination for a bathroom that really creates a boutique feel, like a decorative perfume bottle.Venezia

Venezia

Venezia

 

And how about this spa-like bathroom? I love their shower head options mounted in the ceiling.Acqua Zone

And it comes with "chromotherapy" options, which basically means providing an atmosphere of color to help improve mood and energy levels. I actually did my product design thesis on color therapy and had a similar idea, but didn't pursue water as my method of transmitting color, although I do love this!

Good Design Takes Planning

As with pretty much everything else in life the best results are achieved when there is a "big picture" goal and a plan to follow. Sometimes decorating can feel like a daunting task when you don't have all the pieces yet, or don't know what to do with the pieces you already have. You may know what kind of look you want but find it hard to achieve the desired result because of various limitations. These limitations can be anything from trying to find furniture you love in the right size, waiting for the budget to allow for such purchases, or waiting to inherit a piece promised from a friend or family. The list goes on and on and it can be so frustrating!

This room needs help! Picture from Houzz dilemmas

This room also needs help! Houzz dilemma


But don't give up! It will all come together in good time. Designing a home takes a lot of time and patience, and allowing for things to evolve over time. I just finished reading "The Business of Design" by Keith Granet and I pulled a quote from him that really resonated with me: "A house is a product, a home is a process."  Isn't that so true?


Traditional Living Room
by Toronto Interior Designer Jane Lockhart Interior Design


Contemporary Living Room
by Orlando Photographer Studio KW Photography

Sometimes all you need to get started is a good plan! The design plans I provide as part of my consultation help to define the "big picture" for the space AND help to prioritize each step of the process so you know when to buy things and in what order. It's your own personal check list! Having a design plan saves frustration, keeps you organized, and helps your budget stays on track.

Quick Tips: Organizing the Kitchen

The kitchen always seems to be a vortex of circulating activity where things get thrown in all directions and are easily misplaced. And that can be especially frustrating in a small kitchen space! The more organization you can add to a kitchen the cleaner it will stay and the easier it will be to use it. While there are many beautiful custom cabinets with storage galore, here are a few tips that focus on small kitchens and ways to add organization without a renovation.